Street Child Games leads way with 100 days to Rio 2016

With just 100 days to go until the Olympic Games, the first Street Child Games was featured in the Guardian celebrating the use of sport to elevate the most marginalised groups and provide an opportunity for them to show their potential.

The article, written by Jo Griffin, featured on the front page of the sports section and led with a short film about the Street Child Games created by award-winning UK production company Archer’s Mark.

#100DaystoGo trended across social media, and many Olympic teams took the opportunity to launch their official running kits as they look forward to competing at Rio2016. Yet as mometum builds, the focus on the Street Child Games provides a continued platform for street children and the challenges they face in an international arena and reminds the world that:

“In an era when the problems facing international sport are so evident, from doping and excessive spending to corruption, it also provided a chance to look again at sport’s potential to create a level playing field for marginalised groups – not just on the track but by educating a wider audience about the challenges facing certain groups.”

You can read the full article here.

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  • “It was possible to gather many nationalities, story cultures, viagra 60mg and form a nation: a nation of free man, with equal rights and opportunities, mutual respect, rightful duties. It was 10 days when the world, in that corner of Rio, was fair to socially excluded children; they could feel the beauty of being somebody in this world.”

    Abdul Faquir, Team Mozambique, Project Leader
  • “No child should have to live on the streets and I fully endorse this campaign giving street children a voice to claim their rights”

    Sir Alex Ferguson, Manchester United Manager
  • “When ever people come across me they laugh. It seems like my mouth is zipped because they talk for us. I wish they could give us a chance to talk for ourselves.”

    Mbali, 15, Durban